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Obesity, metabolic syndrome & diabetes

Stefan Chmelik on Weight problems, obesity, & metabolic syndrome

Metabolic syndrome describes a cluster of factors including dyslipidaemia (high or low blood fat levels), glucose intolerance, diabetes and hypertension with organ fat. The problem is a new one and related to modern lifestyle, but increasing worldwide in direct relation to obesity levels.

I have had many people over the years say to me “I put on weight even if I barely eat anything”. For the most part, these people are not deluding themselves, but are victims of Metabolic Syndrome.

Because of the body-mind connection that is central to holistic medicine, a whole-person approach is needed to recover from this problem. What this means is that we recognise that the body affects the thought processes and vice versa. This is why it is so hard to get the motivation to do the things you know will help you – the mind as well as the body becomes sluggish and sustained effort is impossible to maintain.

Just dieting is not enough, and simply talking the problem through is not enough. The right treatment programme will incorporate several aspects, but in a way that is manageable and with all the support you will need.

Conversely, some people find it hard to gain muscle no matter what they eat. This is hard to live with, as the people around them invariably call them ‘lucky’. In reality, it is another form of metabolic imbalance.

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Provocative Therapy has had a significant and ongoing impact on me. The session itself forced to the surface a few truths about myself and my life which I had previously been reluctant to admit to myself. That I found helpful and enlightening. However the real shock came when I watched myself on film afterwards. I was rather dreading having to view myself, especially in such an open and vulnerable position. But nothing prepared me for the shock I had when I firstswitched on the tape. For the first time, I think ever, I was able to view myself objectively. It was not like looking in the mirror or seeing myself on film; never before had I seen myself interact naturally like that. I was surprised how pertinent the contradiction was between the idea I had of myself and how I really appeared. This initial jolt certainly had the most impact but now I’m grateful to have the film so that I can revisit it whenever I need to. Each time it’s almost like going through another session. It forces me toreally look at myself and listen to what I’m saying and to understand that there is a difference between my own, often warped perspective, and the truth in front of me. Louisa Gamon - London    

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