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Definitions of chronic pelvic pain terminology

posted on 17th September 2011 by Stefan Chmelik

Guidelines on Chronic Pelvic Pain (2009)
M. Fall (chairman), A.P. Baranowski, S. Elneil, D. Engeler,
Hughes, E.J. Messelink, F. Oberpenning, A.C. de C. Williams

2.2 Definitions of chronic pelvic pain terminology

Chronic pelvic pain: Non-malignant pain perceived in structures related to the pelvis of either men or women. In the case of documented nociceptive pain that becomes chronic, pain must have been continuous or recurrent for at least 6 months. If non-acute and central sensitization pain mechanisms are well documented, then the pain may be regarded as chronic, irrespective of the time period. In all cases, there often are associated negative cognitive, behavioural, sexual and emotional consequences (5,6)

Pelvic pain syndrome: Persistent or recurrent episodic pelvic pain associated with symptoms suggesting
lower urinary tract, sexual, bowel or gynaecological dysfunction. No proven infection or other obvious pathology (adopted from ICS 2002 report) (1)

Bladder pain syndrome: Suprapubic pain is related to bladder filling, accompanied by other symptoms such as increased daytime and night-time frequency. There is an absence of proven urinary infection or other obvious pathology. This term has been adopted from the ICS 2002 report (1), where the term painful bladder syndrome was used; the name has been changed to bladder pain syndrome to be consistent with other pain syndrome terminology (5,6). The European Society for the Study of IC/PBS (ESSIC) publication places greater emphasis on the pain being perceived in the bladder (4)

Urethral pain syndrome: Recurrent episodic urethral pain, usually on voiding, with daytime frequency and nocturia. Absence of proven infection or other obvious pathology (1)

Penile pain syndrome: Pain within the penis that is not primarily in the urethra. Absence of proven infection or other obvious pathology (5,6)

Prostate pain syndrome: Persistent or recurrent episodic prostate pain, associated with symptoms suggestive of urinary tract and/or sexual dysfunction. No proven infection or other obvious pathology (5,6)
Definition adapted from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus definition and classification of prostatitis (7) and includes conditions described as ‘chronic pelvic painsyndrome’. Using the NIH classification system, prostate pain
syndrome may be subdivided into type A (inflammatory) and type B (noninflammatory)

Scrotal pain syndrome: Persistent or recurrent episodic scrotal pain associated with symptoms suggestive of urinary tract or sexual dysfunction. No proven epididymo-orchitis or other obvious pathology (1)

Testicular pain syndrome: Persistent or recurrent episodic pain localized to the testis on examination, which is associated with symptoms suggestive of urinary tract or sexual dysfunction. No proven epididymo-orchitis or other obvious pathology. This is a more specific definition than scrotal pain syndrome (1)

Post-vasectomy pain syndrome: Scrotal pain syndrome that follows vasectomy (1)

Epididymal pain syndrome: Persistent or recurrent episodic pain localized to the epididymis on examination.
Associated with symptoms suggestive of urinary tract or sexual dysfunction. No proven epididymo-orchitis or other obvious pathology (a more specific definition than scrotal pain syndrome (5,6)

Endometriosis-associated pain syndrome: Chronic or recurrent pelvic pain where endometriosisis present but does not fully explain all the symptoms (5,6)

Vaginal pain syndrome: Persistent or recurrent episodic vaginal pain associated with symptoms suggestive of urinary tract or sexual dysfunction. No proven vaginal infection or other obvious pathology (1)

Vulvar pain syndrome: Persistent or recurrent episodic vulvar pain either related to the micturition cycle or associated with symptoms suggestive of urinary tract or sexual dysfunction. There is no proven infection or other obvious pathology (1)

Generalized vulvar pain syndrome (formally dysaesthetic vulvodynia): Vulval burning or pain that cannot be consistently and tightly localized by point pressure ‘mapping’ by probing with a cotton-tipped applicator or similar
instrument. The vulvar vestibule may be involved but the discomfort is not limited to the vestibule. Clinically, the pain may occur with or without provocation (touch, pressure or friction) (8)

Localized vulvar pain syndrome: Pain consistently and tightly localized by point-pressure mapping to one or more
portions of the vulva. Clinically, pain usually occurs as a result of provocation (touch, pressure or friction) (8)

Vestibular pain syndrome (formerly vulval vestibulitis): Pain localized by point-pressure mapping to one or more portions of the vulval vestibule (8)

Clitoral pain syndrome: Pain localized by point-pressure mapping to the clitoris (8)

Anorectal pain syndrome: Persistent or recurrent, episodic rectal pain with associated rectal trigger points/tenderness related to symptoms of bowel dysfunction. No proven infection or other obvious pathology (5,6)

Pudendal pain syndrome: Neuropathic-type pain arising in the distribution of the pudendal nerve with symptoms and signs of rectal, urinary tract or sexual dysfunction. No proven obvious pathology (5,6). (This is not the same as the well-defined pudendal neuralgia)

Perineal pain syndrome: Persistent or recurrent, episodic, perineal pain either related to the micturition cycle or associated with symptoms suggestive of urinary tract or sexual dysfunction. No proven infection or other obvious pathology (1)

Pelvic floor muscle pain syndrome: Persistent or recurrent, episodic, pelvic floor pain with associated trigger points,
which is either related to the micturition cycle or associated with symptoms suggestive of urinary tract, bowel or sexual dysfunction. No proven infection or other obvious pathology (5,6)

Full list of terms for Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome:

  • Interstitial cystitis (IC)
  • Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (PFD)
  • Vestibulitis, vulvodynia, clitorodynia, vaginismus, prostatodynia
  • Non-bacterial cystitis or prostatitis
  • Reproductive pelvic pain
  • Dyspareunia
  • Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC)
  • Overactive Bladder Syndrome (OBS)
  • Irritable Pelvis Syndrome (IPS)
  • Urgency-Frequency Syndrome (UFS)
  • Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS )
  • Prostate Pain Syndrome (PPS)
  • Painful Bladder Syndrome (PBS)
  • Endometriosis Associated Pain Syndrome
  • Urethral Pain Syndrome
  • Penile Pain Syndrome
  • Scrotal Pain Syndrome
  • Vaginal Pain Syndrome
  • Vulvar Pain Syndrome
  • Pudendal Pain Syndrome
  • Vestibular Pain Syndrome
  • Clitoral Pain Syndrome
  • Epididymal Pain Syndrome
  • Post-vastectomy Pain Syndrome
  • Perpetual Arousal Syndrome (PAS)
 Definitions of chronic pelvic pain terminology

About Stefan Chmelik

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